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xjunkie4jesus

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Posts: 235 Member Since: 06/09/13

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Aug 23 14 9:46 PM

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I just found out online that there 's a REASON the "N8" is printed on only ONE side of the strip... Cuz that's the "adhesive side" to the mucous membranes!! Would've been good to know before now! Now it dissolves more quickly!
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xjunkie4jesus

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Posts: 235 Member Since:06/09/13

#2 [url]

Aug 27 14 5:03 AM

There is no leaflet

The pharmacy's enclosed drug info sheet does not mention it, no leaflet was enclosed and my doc never mentioned it. I can't imagine that something like that is not important to include in the pharmacy info sheet!

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sapphire76

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#3 [url]

Aug 29 14 3:35 AM

I'd bring it up with the pharmacy. There should be a patient information leaflet, and if the pharmacy choose to include further info, things like that should be included on it.

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skibo

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#4 [url]

Sep 13 14 5:19 PM

So do I understand correctly, The side with the N and 8 showing, is the side that you put against the tongue? Wow I have taken this for about 9 months now and I have never stuck it on my tongue that way. Always the opposite side from the N 8. It sticks just fine. Dissolves in about 15 minutes. I usually spit out after this time to try and keep as much naloxone out of me. It causes enormous headaches for me. But that is interesting to hear. I'm gonna have to check it out.   Thanks

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sapphire76

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#5 [url]

Sep 14 14 5:47 AM

Skibo - if the Naloxone is causing that many problems for you, can you not just change to Subutex, as I doubt that spitting the film out before it's completely dissolved is lessening the Naloxone, it's just going to be lessening ALL the active ingredients.

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skibo

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#6 [url]

Sep 14 14 9:17 AM

Well, I guess I could ask the doc if he would but I just assumed, by way of the paperwork leading to his services that was what he prescribed and thats that. But hey wont hurt to ask. I actually was told at the first place I attended, headache was a real common side effect and to just let the strip dissolve after 15- 25 minutes and get rid of it. Actually works perfect. No more headache. The pharmacist did tell me the other day, when I filled my last prescription, that the generic was cheaper, if I would ask him for it maybe he would prescribe it. Dont know nothing about generic or subutex.  I started these strips after a 10 solid year run with methadone. Thought I would never get off methadone. Fit me perfect. Life was great. But this is doing pretty good. Thanks for the suggestion.

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sapphire76

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#7 [url]

Sep 15 14 3:58 AM

The Naloxone can cause quite a few problems for some people, like headaches, nausea and severe anxiety. As the Naloxone only has a short half life, and a very low bioavailability when administered orally it really is little more than a marketing gimmick on the part of the manufacturers. If I were ever to take bupe, I would go for Subutex every time.

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marvin

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Posts: 5 Member Since:09/23/14

#8 [url]

Sep 25 14 6:12 PM

@saphire I think most people don't have a choice in the matter. Naloxone like you said, does nothing, and was added basically because they were losing the patent on te stuff. I was fortunate enough to have a nice doc that prescribed subutex so I could get generics as I'm a student and don't have the money to pay for brand name subs. But the naloxone doesn't do anything from what I can tell. I've shot the strips and it doesn't put you in percip w/ds like the doctors say it will.

marvin

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sapphire76

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#9 [url]

Sep 26 14 2:51 AM

When you're using Suboxone with short acting opiates like heroin, it will not put you into precipitated WD's like you say. If however you took Suboxone and a long acting opioid like methadone together, that will make you very, very ill. That is why if a person switches from methadone to Suboxone or Subutex they have to have a short period where they do not take any methadone before taking their first dose of Subs.

It's not the Naloxone that would cause the precipitated WD's, it's the antagonist part of the buprenorphine.

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the elephantman

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Posts: 802 Member Since:08/30/11

#10 [url]

Sep 28 14 3:48 AM

@sapphire: I can't count the times i've had too thoroughly explain to people that the nalaxone is NOT the reason precipitated withdrawal occurs. Its the buprenorphine itself. If a person has say, methadone on their opiate receptors and they take bupe, the bupe will knock all the methadone off the receptors due to its higher affinity for the opiate receptors. A lot of people think because they took subutex, precipitated withdrawal won't occur but that is INCORRECT.

@xjunkie4jesus: Thats just crazy!! I would say that particular detail is one of the most important factors every patient should know. The lack of knowledge some of these suboxone doctors have about bupe is mind blowing. Do you mind if i ask you where that information is so people on here could further educate themselves on the matter? Maybe you could copy/paste the link? Thanks!!

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sapphire76

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#11 [url]

Sep 28 14 4:39 AM

Eman - yeah I know, LOL!! People just seemt o assume that it must be the Naloxone for some reason.

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