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philly115

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#41 [url]

Apr 10 13 8:54 AM

@ sapphire: Yep and I hate that because that's what gives methadone a bad name is people that don't have a prescription for benzos and that want to mix them and people automatically think that it's the methadone causing the person to be zombified.. I know my mother for one thought methadone made u out to be a zombie and that's because someone I know went to a methadone clinic and bought fans and mixed em and she thought o my the methadone makes u like that and she thought it was a terrible thing until I explained to her that it was the benzos and that they were taking 14mgs of xanex a day which is way too much in my opinion combined with methadone. NY mother finally understood that methadone doesn't make people like that and that ur was the benzos and methadone combined, and now she likes methadone because she's seen how it's helped me and she sees that I'm never sedated @ all..

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zac talbott

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#42 [url]

Apr 10 13 10:26 AM

This is something we have to combat & fight on a near daily basis... I'm so glad to read that patients & advocates realize what's really going on when people blame methadone for the "zombies" who abuse benzos while on methadone therapy. I support the clinic crackdown on illicit benzo use not only because it is extremely dangerous (which it is), but also because illicit benzo misuse while on MMT creates non-compliant patients who (even often without knowing it) perpetuate much of the stigma and misconception that is so damaging to the true image of our treatment. Tell it from the mountains, guys! ;-) Speak on it!

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wayovermyhead

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#43 [url]

Apr 11 13 10:09 AM

That Douglas Varney is in charge of all that dose regulation BS in Tennessee.  He is not a doctor.....

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philly115

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#44 [url]

Apr 11 13 12:17 PM

Well I just found out they've found another doctor for my clinic because my original doc was just filling in temporarily until we got one. State still has to approve of this new doctor so hopefully it'll be at least another month, or hopefully 2 is what I'm hoping where I can get to my stable dose, or close to it. I hate when this happens things start getting a little better then bam another doctor is going to be coming here. I'm going to see if my original doc the one filling in if he will write a note or leave some notes in the computer about me for the other doctor about all that I've went through to get to where I'm @ because if not this doc will come in and want another peak and trough, and may not even approve of me taking one. It all depends on if this new doctor believes in higher doses, but idk. They said he's a doctor in the ER so that could be a good thing or a bad thing. Hopefully my original doc will be around for a little while longer.

Alot of changes are always going on @ my clinic and it's tough having to see new doctors and me have to try an explain myself because of my dose. I've never had to explain myself to the original doc because he understands I need a higher dose, but the one that got fired not long ago wouldn't even see me he just had the nurses talk to me, and I tried to see him for 3 months, and never got to see him. I had to explain myself to the nurse practioner because she wanted to know why I was on so high of a dose by her standards.

We're in the process of getting suboxone @ our clinic, and I'm going to lose my counselor because she's moving up to a higher position @ my clinic so yea lot of changes going to be happening my favorite doc is leaving the one that has helped keep me motivated here lately, and helped, and understands and is really a great doc, but hopefully this new doctor will be understanding.

With how strict state is the last thing I need is to have to struggle with state and a new doctor. If the new doc is one of these low dose docs then I guess I will have to transfer. I've still been doing research, and I've had my mind set on cape girardeau Missouri, but I just found out Evansville Indiana is just as close, and I know people that go to Indiana clinics and they like it there, but I haven't called evansville yet so idk if they would allow me to keep my take homes, or if they require me to be a resident of Indiana. I know cape girardeau allows patients to transfer from other states, and u keep your take homes, and they don't do peak and troughs.

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mike75

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#45 [url]

Apr 11 13 12:19 PM

In my opinion that makes Doug Varney and the Tennessee Department of Mental Health sitting ducks for a lawsuit...after all his name isn't Dr. Douglas Varney is it?  if it isn't i don't see how this one man can be responsible for thousands of people on MMT here in this state not to mention most are underdosed.


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the elephantman

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#46 [url]

Apr 11 13 3:42 PM

@philly, unless its a clinic policy or some random state rule, u can attend any clinic of ur liking, even if that be in another state. Theres definitely no law about crossing statelines. We can only hope it stays this way.

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philly115

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#47 [url]

Apr 11 13 5:32 PM

@ eman: Yea I happened to check on some facilities @ Evansville Indiana is a little over 3 hours one way, and that's about the same as cape girardeau so I'm going to compare them and see which one seems better. I may still stay I'm Tennessee, but idk things are just getting a little much, and my original doc the one filling in is going to leave eventually, but I'm hoping to get to a stable dose before he leaves. I'm just hoping that this new doc doesn't come in and tell me I don't need anymore increases or even worse trys to lower me. I'm probably just thinking about it too much, but I've been through so much BS that it's hard not to think negative when that's about all that I've had happen to me with jumping through all these hoops..

If I transfer though I need to make sure that the clinic I transfer to at least allows me to start out @ 1 week take homes. I know the clinic in cape said that I would stay on the same phase and get take homes my first day there so that's good. I'm going to call the Indiana clinic tmro and see what their policies are. The reason why I'm thinking Indiana too is because one of my friends good friends come down and was talking about how their clinic is in Indiana and she told her how many P&t's I've had to take to get to where I'm @ and she said she's never had to get a p&t and that she was on a higher dose and they don't low dose u that they get u to the right dose u need to be @ so that's def a good thing.

My main issue here in Tennessee is they want to keep patients on lower doses and if a patients need a higher dose they make then go thru so much BS that they give up and just give in and suffer, and just stay under dosed and sick. I'm doing my best to keep a positive attitude, and my original doc the one that's temporarily filling in has really helped me as far as telling me not to give up that he would get me to where I need to be that it may be a long road, but that he would get me there.

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sapphire76

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#48 [url]

Apr 12 13 3:59 AM

@philly - a new doctor sounds like the last thing you need at the moment. If I were you, I'd try to get your current doctor to put all your increase request through before he leaves, as you don't know if the new doctor is going to have some funny ideas about what constitutes a "high" dose.

TN seems to be so hard to get to the dose you need, that you might be best going out of state.

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philly115

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#49 [url]

Apr 12 13 7:06 AM

@ sapphire: I'm def going to talk to my doc and see how much longer he thinks he'll be around. The thing that scares me is last time it happened so quick that he was gone before I ever got to see him again and that new doc was there and thankfully he got fired really quick, and now the original doc I like is back.

If my doc doesn't think he'll be around much longer then only thing I can ask him to do is leave a few notes in the computer about me for the new doc and hopefully the new doc will follow them maybe. If the doc turns out like the last one that was here that got fired then I'm transferring because if the state keeps bringing in new docs that only practice low doses then I'm for sure leaving Tennessee and transferring to a clinic out of state. Hopefully I can get almost stable, or stable before my doc leaves, and if not then hopefully this new doc will listen to the suggestions my doctor leaves him.

This new doctor works in the ER "Emergency Room" so that could be a good thing, or a BAD thing. Some ER docs are good, and some are all non narcotic, and try to make the patient get by on the smallest amount of anything possible. Hopefully this doc will turn out to be good, or even better maybe it'll be a couple months before he gets here lol "wishful thinking"..

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wayovermyhead

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#50 [url]

Apr 12 13 5:49 PM

...I want to FYI everyone regarding something I do not think everyone knows about or realizes....States have different time constraints for level and phases and this can be a good thing or a bad thing such as people in Tennessee can get 13 takehomes after 1 year and NC is 2 years with compliance so if you leave Tennessee with 13 takehomes and go to NC in Month 13 of MMT you will only get the amount of takehomes for 13 months of MMT per NC State with compliance which is 6 takehomes so you lose 7 takehomes, and yet such as with Eman leaving Florida which takes 4 years to get 13 takehomes he went from 6 takehomes straight to 13 takehomes because he had plenty of compliance time per the State of NC although his level was noted as a level you would only get 6 takehomes but the time he had in MMT (over 2 years with compliance) afforded him 13 takehomes. 

So don't just inquire about the level or phase number you are in per say you need to talk time of compliance you have and also another thing GROUPS if you go to a clinic that requires groups sometimes (not always but it is for sure in the medicaid clinics) you could have to wait until you meet the group according to your levels.....

This had held up a few patients I have met from Tennessee regarding my clinic and the takehome allowance and phase/time constraints and I have seen at the medicaid clinic in my town Tennessee folks being fooled because they did not have the groups done that the NC medicaid opiate replacement rules want done.....So you in fact get demoted.  Please make sure you look into all these natters when transferring.....

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philly115

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#51 [url]

Apr 12 13 7:07 PM

If I decide to transfer I'm def going to look into how the other states are. What I'm going to do is if I decide to transfer then the first thing I'm going to do is I'm going to guest dose @ the clinic that I'm considering attending that way I can kind've get a feel and see how the staff are etc. As long as I get 6 carryouts like I'm currently getting now then I'm fine. I've been in treatment for 15 months exactly & I'm eligible for 2 week carries @ a time, but I've just stayed @ going to the clinic once a week because I like it that way for now..

I'm sure wherever I transfer I should be able to get at least a weeks worth of carries, but I've also heard of some inics making new transfers start all over, but the cape girardeau clinic nurses told me that I would get two weeks @ a time if I wanted them if I transfer there. I haven't spoke with the clinic in Indiana yet, but I'm about to call them tmro. It's a 3 1/2 hour drive one way to both of them, so I'd be looking @ 7 hours of driving so I'd prob move up to going twice a month instead of 4 times if they'll allow me, but either way once a week ain't 2 bad.

I appreciate the info way, but I'll continue to keep everyone updated on what I decide to do. I really would like to move to a different state, but that would mean having to find a different job, and all that, but I've been considering alot of different options. I really wouldn't mind moving to either Texas or south Carolina if I get the opportunity..

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sapphire76

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#52 [url]

Apr 13 13 5:24 AM

@Philly - the thing that would worry me about an ER doctor would be that they would be jaded from having idiots come in pretending they had a "back ache" just so they could get a shot of something or some pills.

Hopefully though, if he wants to work at a methadone clinic, he will be a little more understanding!

If they already have the new doctor lined up, I'd definitely make sure the old doctor puts all your paperwork through now, as you don't know if the new doctor is going to be an ass that won't allow any doses over 120mg, whatever the circumstances are!

I think that what @Way is saying about the take-homes needs to be taken into consideration, but personally I'd rather be adequately dosed, and not have to be worrying about getting P&T's and state approval for every 5 or 10mg increase, even if it did mean going to the clinic a little more frequently for a while until I had some time under my belt at the new clinic and they upped my take-home phases.

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zac talbott

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#53 [url]

Apr 13 13 8:13 AM

Great advice @wayovermy head! While the states regs are "less strict" and the state doesn't further restrict takehomes from the federal guidelines where I attend in Georgia, that isn't the case with neighboring North Carolina (as you pointed out) or other states. If TN residents are considering transferring to clinics in neighboring states I strongly 2nd the suggestion made by wayovermyhead... Make sure you understand how your time in treatment & compliance will be interpreted under that particular state's guidelines... :-)

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philly115

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#54 [url]

Apr 13 13 1:05 PM

@ sapphire & zac: The thing that worries me is like sapphire pointed out that this new doc is an ER doc, but maybe he'll turn out good. My counselor told me that he said he wanted to come to this clinic to help people because he definitely sees a place for methadone, and that he thinks it's a great thing, so that's good, but if he really believes what he says then he should adequately dose patients and if not then he really doesn't believe what he preaches.

If things continue the way they are though where I have to keep jumping through hoops just to get 10mg increases then there's def a good possibility that I will check into a clinic out of state. Cape girardeau, Missouri, and Evansville, Indiana. I've already checked with the Cape clinic and they said that I could get two weeks carries @ a time as soon as I start there, and that they don't do peak and troughs, but I haven't talked to the clinic in Indiana yet.

I know that I've talked to people I know in Indiana that goes to a clinic there and they're on higher doses and said that they don't have any issues with getting adequately dosed like I am in Tennessee.. When I told my friends friend in Indiana about all that I've been put through here in Tennessee they couldn't believe it and said that would never happen in Indiana. They said I would've already been @ my stable dose in Indiana 9 months ago.

I'm going to guest dose @ both clinics to see how I like them, and get a good feel, and sit down and talk to some of the staff to get all the rules explained to me. I believe if I would just make myself go guest dose @ those clinics in the next couple weeks that I would probably transfer this month lol because I'm sure I'm going to like any clinic outside of Tennessee. I'm not trying to run Tennessee down, and people can get good methadone treatment here if they can get by on 100mgs or less, but if they need more then they're more than likely not going to like the treatment and be treated like I have.

If I would've been in any other state though things would've been a lot better and I would've already been to a stable dose by now more than likely. It's really hard for patients in Tennessee to get over 100mgs because u have to get a trough @ 100mgs and if your levels aren't low enough then the doctor and state will deny ur increase, and then if ur levels are low enough then u may have to get another trough to get to 120, and then to go any higher than 120 you have to get a peak and trough sometimes every 10mgs and the doc has to approve it, and also the state of Tennessee.

They make you come for 7 days in a row and face dose now, and then u could wait up to 2 weeks after that to get your results back from the peak and trough, and then when the results come in u have to meet with the doctor and if he approves u an increase if your levels come back low enough then he has to send the peak and trough levels off to state and then state looks @ them and it could take up to 3 weeks and they either approve or deny, and if they approve u have to come for another seven days and dose your new dose in front of the nurses for seven more days until u get ur carryouts back.

As u can see it takes a very long time to just get 10mgs which is really really ridiculous in my opinion. I get tired of having to go through all this, and I would really like to transfer, but I guess I keep hoping that things may work out for me idk.

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wayovermyhead

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#55 [url]

Apr 13 13 3:18 PM


They make you come for 7 days in a row and face dose now, and then u could wait up to 2 weeks after that to get your results back from the peak and trough, and then when the results come in u have to meet with the doctor and if he approves u an increase if your levels come back low enough then he has to send the peak and trough levels off to state and then state looks @ them and it could take up to 3 weeks and they either approve or deny, and if they approve u have to come for another seven days and dose your new dose in front of the nurses for seven more days until u get ur carryouts back.

As u can see it takes a very long time to just get 10mgs which is really really ridiculous in my opinion  I get tired of having to go through all this, and I would really like to transfer, but I guess I keep hoping that things may work out for me idk.

-philly115

Just reading that paragraph is exhausting......Trying to comprehend it is frustrating and accepting it is traumatic.......So please note in the second paragraph the highlighted/underlined is exactly what they are aiming for in a bully like fashion.....I get tired of having to go through all this,  I just can't fathom the effect this must play on the addicts and how many die because they can't jump all these hoops to get a dose that will make them well and not craving which leads them back to relapse.  WTF is wrong with these people???  UURRGGHH my head hurts and stomach aches (truly at this very moment) cause I can't stand the thought of all the deaths, wasted relapses etc...taking place as a result of this.  I am very sad to say there are not a lot of "@Phillys" out there that will fight like that, can hoe the row like he does, can suffer thru the cravings without endangering their lives by using nor even have the luxury of entertaining the idea of seeking treatment in another State etc....(Not minimizing your efforts Philly just realizing you are one of the lucky ones that can escape possibly if all else fails).  Once again Shame on any Tennessee Official etc...that supports this BS and Shame on the ones that don't but do nothing about it.  No wonder Tennessee has one of the highest opiate addiction ratios and mortality census.  ATTENTION MR. (dick oops I mean) DOUGLAS VARNEY.....DO YOU KNOW YOUR STATE IS IN NEED OF YOUR HELP NOT YOUR HARM.......??????.........

Just an article I saw the other day and this is 2013 article about 2012 figures......With numbers like that you would think that State might be a little more responsive and/or open minded regarding doing whatever it takes to assist/offer/promote any and all forms of recovery/treatment etc.....


New Tennessee law targets prescription drug abuse


Tennessee is ranked in the top 1 percent of states that sell prescription pain medication. It’s also in the nation’s top 10 for overdose deaths.
A growing unhealthy population base suffering the effects of obesity, diabetes and other related conditions that morph into chronic pain has physicians calling for a new prescription to monitor the dispensing of opiates and controlled substances.
The Volunteer state joined its neighbor Virginia in establishing a controlled substance monitoring database but loopholes exist that allow an abuser the means to “doctor shop” or get prescriptions at another clinic or office for the same or similar pain medication.

Virginia began its prescription collective following a 2004 law introduced by Sen. William Wampler, R-Bristol. Tennessee’s was created two years later.
“We had gotten complaints from clinicians around the state that there was too big of a lag between when a prescription was dispensed to a patient and when it needed to be reported to the controlled substance prescription database,” said Dr. David Reagan, chief medical officer for the Tennessee Department of Health.
In that time, 1,059 Tennesseans died of prescription drug overdoses, according to numbers provided by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
The Prescription Safety Act of 2012, signed into law this spring by Gov. Bill Haslam, requires all licensed physicians in Tennessee to have their offices registered by next week. The law also shrinks the reporting time doctors have for plugging in specific pain pill data per patient, from 30 days to seven.

Reagan said prescription drug abuse and deaths are at epidemic proportions in Tennessee, as evidenced by a study given to lawmakers during the Tennessee General Assembly’s 2011 session.
“For the last two years, unintentional drug overdose is the number one cause of death in Tennessee over motor vehicle accidents, homicides or suicides,” Reagan said of the study results. “It really is a significant problem and the ages of these victims from overdose range from 30 to 60 with the peak range from ages 40 to 49.”
Doctors in Tennessee prescribed 17 retail pain prescriptions per capita in 2009. The national average was 12, the study said.

“There is an epidemic of overuse, abuse and overdose death from opiate narcotics, so this act really focused on trying to create a safer environment for Tennesseans, where the patient and the physician would have all the right information, up-to-date, at the time that the decision to treat with a controlled substance is being made,” Reagan said. “Right now, we believe that in many instances up-to-date information is not available and sometimes decisions are made that can have adverse impacts on the patient or the community.”

Dr. Lisa Broyles, a physician with a practice in Johnson City and a delegate to the Tennessee Medical Association, said recent data showing that nearly 63 percent of the state’s population will be clinically obese by the year 2030 has a spinoff effect that breeds constant pain.
“We see a large amount of prescription drug abuse, unfortunately, among teenagers and the older population because we have a fair amount of unhealthy people here and when you’re unhealthy and tend to have pain and easily get addicted to pain medications or depression and anxiety medicines and they can’t come off of them, and it becomes a habit,” Broyles said.

“When you have an area where you have more unhealthy people like the South, Tennessee and West Virginia, you are going to have a higher percentage of narcotic prescriptions being used, which leads to a large number of abusers.”
Another facet of the law will require doctors to reference the database once they begin a new line of treatment with the patient beginning in April 2013.
Broyles hopes the attention to detail also begins the downfall of a spurt of pain clinics opened in Tennessee from pill-mill specialists who go with a cash-only, pill-for-profit operations.

“They have also tightened regulations on pain clinics or pill mills. Doctors were coming in from other states and dispensing pain medication for cash only. No longer are you allowed to do that. They have also tightened things on who is allowed to operate a pain clinic and dispense medications. Doctors now have to take a prescription medication safety class to maintain certification and that is something we have to do every two years to keep our license, and that keeps doctors current on recent laws and what we need to do to keep our patients safe,” she said.

Tennessee is ranked in the top 1 percent of states that sell prescription pain medication. It’s also in the nation’s top 10 for overdose deaths.

A growing unhealthy population base suffering the effects of obesity, diabetes and other related conditions that morph into chronic pain has physicians calling for a new prescription to monitor the dispensing of opiates and controlled substances.
The Volunteer state joined its neighbor Virginia in establishing a controlled substance monitoring database but loopholes exist that allow an abuser the means to “doctor shop” or get prescriptions at another clinic or office for the same or similar pain medication.

Virginia began its prescription collective following a 2004 law introduced by Sen. William Wampler, R-Bristol. Tennessee’s was created two years later.
“We had gotten complaints from clinicians around the state that there was too big of a lag between when a prescription was dispensed to a patient and when it needed to be reported to the controlled substance prescription database,” said Dr. David Reagan, chief medical officer for the Tennessee Department of Health.
In that time, 1,059 Tennesseans died of prescription drug overdoses, according to numbers provided by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
The Prescription Safety Act of 2012, signed into law this spring by Gov. Bill Haslam, requires all licensed physicians in Tennessee to have their offices registered by next week. The law also shrinks the reporting time doctors have for plugging in specific pain pill data per patient, from 30 days to seven.

Reagan said prescription drug abuse and deaths are at epidemic proportions in Tennessee, as evidenced by a study given to lawmakers during the Tennessee General Assembly’s 2011 session.

“For the last two years, unintentional drug overdose is the number one cause of death in Tennessee over motor vehicle accidents, homicides or suicides,” Reagan said of the study results. “It really is a significant problem and the ages of these victims from overdose range from 30 to 60 with the peak range from ages 40 to 49.”
Doctors in Tennessee prescribed 17 retail pain prescriptions per capita in 2009. The national average was 12, the study said.

“There is an epidemic of overuse, abuse and overdose death from opiate narcotics, so this act really focused on trying to create a safer environment for Tennesseans, where the patient and the physician would have all the right information, up-to-date, at the time that the decision to treat with a controlled substance is being made,” Reagan said. “Right now, we believe that in many instances up-to-date information is not available and sometimes decisions are made that can have adverse impacts on the patient or the community.”

Dr. Lisa Broyles, a physician with a practice in Johnson City and a delegate to the Tennessee Medical Association, said recent data showing that nearly 63 percent of the state’s population will be clinically obese by the year 2030 has a spinoff effect that breeds constant pain.

“We see a large amount of prescription drug abuse, unfortunately, among teenagers and the older population because we have a fair amount of unhealthy people here and when you’re unhealthy and tend to have pain and easily get addicted to pain medications or depression and anxiety medicines and they can’t come off of them, and it becomes a habit,” Broyles said.
“When you have an area where you have more unhealthy people like the South, Tennessee and West Virginia, you are going to have a higher percentage of narcotic prescriptions being used, which leads to a large number of abusers.”
Another facet of the law will require doctors to reference the database once they begin a new line of treatment with the patient beginning in April 2013.
Broyles hopes the attention to detail also begins the downfall of a spurt of pain clinics opened in Tennessee from pill-mill specialists who go with a cash-only, pill-for-profit operations.

“They have also tightened regulations on pain clinics or pill mills. Doctors were coming in from other states and dispensing pain medication for cash only. No longer are you allowed to do that. They have also tightened things on who is allowed to operate a pain clinic and dispense medications. Doctors now have to take a prescription medication safety class to maintain certification and that is something we have to do every two years to keep our license, and that keeps doctors current on recent laws and what we need to do to keep our patients safe,” she said.

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wayovermyhead

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#56 [url]

Apr 13 13 3:36 PM

ATTACHED YOU WILL FIND THE COMPLETED RULES FOR THE STATE OF TENNESSEE REGARDING OPIOID TX FACILITIES....i.e. STATE SOTA RULES
The first area is where I guess Douglas Varney is obligated/involved etc......

RULES OF THE TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF MENTAL HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES CHAPTER 0940-05-42 MINIMUM PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS FOR NON-RESIDENTIAL OPIOID TREATMENT PROGRAM FACILITIES

(1) The commissioner shall designate an individual within the department to serve as the SOTA to facilitate oversight and technical assistance to opioid treatment programs. The individual designated shall have demonstrated education and background evidencing comprehensive knowledge of opioid drugs and their effects.
(2) The powers and duties of the SOTA include, but are not limited to, the following:
(a) Facilitating the development and implementation of rules, regulations, standards and best practice guidelines to assure the quality of services delivered by opioid treatment programs;
(b) Acting as a liaison between relevant State and federal agencies;
(c) Reviewing opioid treatment guidelines and regulations developed by the federal
government;
(d) Assuring delivery of technical assistance and informational materials to opioid
treatment programs as needed;
(e) Performing both the scheduled and unscheduled site visits to opioid treatment
programs in cooperation with department licensure office or other governmental
oversight agencies, or as designated by the SOTA, when necessary and appropriate,
and preparing reports as appropriate to assist the department’s licensure office or
other governmental oversight agencies;
(f) Consulting with the federal government regarding approval or disapproval of requests for exceptions to federal regulations, where appropriate;
(g) Reviewing and approving exceptions to federal and state dosage policies and
procedures;
(h) Receiving and addressing service recipient appeals and grievances;
(i) Monitoring of performance outcomes. The following performance indicators may be used to evaluate the impact of the program on service recipients and the community:
1. Service recipient satisfaction.
2. Service recipient employment status.
3. Improvement in medical conditions.
4. Drop-out rate.
5. Recidivism rates.
6. Alcohol use.
7. Criminal arrests.
8. Illicit drug use, as indicated by drug screens.
9. Improvement in social and living standards; and
(j) Working cooperatively with other relevant state agencies to determine the service need in the location of a proposed program.


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mike75

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#57 [url]

Apr 13 13 3:59 PM

After reading the above articles on Tennessee it would seem like this state would at least know the situation is very dire and they could really do some good and help a lot of people but they won't.I bet if more people knew about methadone they would seek the help and this would also take a lot of addicts off the street and keep the crime rate down.It would also keep the jails from overcrowding with people with opioid addiction and have them steered to a place where they could get help.Tennessee is dropping the ball big time on this one.This article above lets us know Tennessee is number one in prescription drug abuse and yet it seems like there is no prevention efforts or any type of programs to let these people know there are medications like methadone that will help them break free from the habit.Mr. Dick Varney yeah i said it is just one of the people in charge who have made some of these dumb rules and guidelines while thinking he is really doing something but in reality we know he is making it very hard on the patients here to be dosed properly.Its almost like these ironclad rules are there to discourage people and if that was his intent its certainly working because a lot of people are frustrated and underdosed.The powers that be could do some good and get a lot of this under control with proper education and letting people know they have options like methadone but they don't do anything but spout off numbers of all the people who OD'd or died instead of doing something about it.In regards to the powers that be helping or doing something EPIC FAIL=TENNESSEE

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philly115

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Posts: 410 Member Since:01/01/13

#58 [url]

Apr 13 13 4:23 PM

@ way: Mr Dick Varney lmao :). U cracked me up with that one lol.. I appreciate all the info way some of that stuff I didn't know, but I def appreciate u posting it. Yea way & mike if Varney and whoever else over this stuff in tennessee would just quit being barbaric then things would be better. I wish that he could see that Tennessee is doing more harm than help to us patients by all these nonsense rules they put in place.

If they would quit it with the low dose and all the time consuming things just to get a 10mg increase they would see people doing so much better, but I guess Tennessee just wants to be known as being a low dose state, and stay set in their ways no matter what. It's very frustrating and I hate that I have to be going through all this, but in the end it's looking like I'm probably going to have to transfer, and I'm sure if I did I would get rid of alot of stress out of my life.

It's just stressful with the withdrawals I'm still currently having, and then having to jump through their hoops and play their little games while I'm feeling terrible and gritting my teeth and trying to be as positive as possible. I wish Tennessee could just quit being this way, but there's always going to be a few states that want to be worse than others.

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briton32

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Posts: 287 Member Since:02/23/10

#59 [url]

Apr 13 13 9:23 PM

I agree with the stuff way said that you need to know about a clinic in a different state if you transfer.. but I wanted to add in one.. You NEED to know their call back policy(or if they even have one) because sometimes getting a call one day and having to make a 7hr round trip unexpectedly the next may be a problem then you are stuck making a 7 day round trip every day for so many days for missing the callback..

 I know that especially here in the small county I live in I don't know to many people that haven't been affected by opiate drug use... If I had to estimate I would say that over 60% of the people in my county are on methadone thru the clinic  or suboxone  and another 20+% could use it.. Its sad.. In the papers and stuff its always talking about how meth(crystal meth that is) is a huge problem here and while it is opiate or prescription pain killer abuse is twice as bad...

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zac talbott

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Posts: 745 Member Since:03/02/13

#60 [url]

Apr 13 13 9:50 PM

You're very right briton32... There is ONE thing that MANY patients don't know, however.. You have 24hours to RETURN THE CALL from the time they call you... Then you have ANOTHER 24hours from returning their call to actually REPORT to the clinic... So that actually gives patients 48 hours, if necessary, to get to the clinic for a callback. Clinics don't always want patients to know that for some reason, but that's the regulation/law. But if you live a LONG distance form the clinic I COMPLETELY agree with you... Know the call back policy before transferring as well. Some clinics (especially those that receive public monies) are more "strict" and do call backs more often than others.

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Zac Talbott | Director & Patient Advocate

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